Lumota
LUMOTA_LOGO_ETSY-2.jpg

LUMOTA

Lumota: The Finnish word meaning to mesmerize or enthrall. 

Himmelis were traditionally made with straw from a Finnish family’s crop of rye and hung over the winter harvest festival table to ensure a good crop the following year - the more elaborate the himmeli, the more abundant next year’s crop. The most beautiful himmeli were stored hanging from the rafters of Finnish attics from one year to the next. 

I have been interested in Scandinavian design and mid century modern design since living with my Swedish step granny, Ingrid,  in Toronto in ’99. She was a successful and talented textile designer and greatly influenced my sense of style in home decor. I married my husband in 2003 and shortly after we bought our first home. We spent hours over the years searching through Toronto’s East End shops buying mid century modern furnishings. After visiting Finland in 2006 my love for Scandinavian style was cemented.

When I first became aware of himmelis I found the design so intriguing and eye-catching, I had to find out more. It didn’t take long to discover that the craft of making himmeli has Finnish roots which I found fascinating. My father-in-law, Keijo, is from Finland and my husband and children have dual citizenship. I learned that my father-in-law and most of the extended family still living in Finland had made himmelis themselves as a Christmas-time tradition when they were children. I knew I had to teach myself to make himmelis. Through emails with my Finnish cousins and purchasing Eija Koski's amazing and beautiful book, Himmeli, I have finessed the craft and created my own style of which I am very proud and pleased to share. 

In 2015 I began selling my modern interpretation of the himmeli with great success at indie markets, on Etsy and in a growing number of retail locations in Western Canada.

Lumota: The Finnish word meaning to mesmerize or enthrall. 

Johnna Puusa is the designer behind Lumota. She lives with her family in Shawnigan Lake, British Columbia.

Himmelis were traditionally made with straw from a Finnish family ’s crop of rye and hung over the table during the winter harvest festival to ensure a good crop the following year - the more elaborate the himmeli, the more abundant next year’s crop. The most beautiful himmeli were stored hanging from the rafters of Finnish attics from one year to the next. 

 Johnna and her kids

Johnna and her kids

Johnna Puusa has been interested in Scandinavian design and mid century modern design since living with her Swedish step-granny, Ingrid, in Toronto in 1999.  Ingrid was a successful and talented textile designer and greatly influenced Johnna's sense of style in home decor. In 2004 Johnna and her husband, Andrew, bought their first home in Toronto's Danforth area. They spent hours over the years searching through Toronto’s East End shops for mid century modern furnishings. After visiting Finland in 2006 her love for Scandinavian style was cemented.

When Johnna first became aware of the craft of himmeli she found the designs so intriguing and mesmerizing that she had to find out more. It didn’t take long to discover that the art form has Finnish roots which she found exciting. Her father-in-law, Keijo, is from Finland and her husband and children have dual citizenship. She learned that Keijo and the extended family still living in Finland had made himmelis themselves as a Christmas-time tradition when they were children. She loved the connection and felt compelled to study the history and art of making himmeli. Through emails with Finnish cousins and by purchasing Eija Koski's beautiful book, Himmeli, she has learned the methods and has finessed the craft, producing traditional pieces as well as creating her own style along the way.